Canadians ‘Don’t Like Rich Asians’, Complains Senator

A British Columbia senator in an interview with a Hong Kong newspaper complained Canadians don’t like rich Asians. The remarks followed a cabinet proposal to impose a $217 million-a year equity tax on foreign real estate speculators: “For some weird reason we don’t like the rich ones.”

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Grow Carrots In The Arctic

The Privy Council in Access To Information memos proposed to fund large-scale construction of subsidized greenhouses to grow carrots and tomatoes in the Arctic. Staff cited a “potential to launch” in 2020 or 2021: “A broad range of interventions and solutions are required.”

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Feds Vow Speedy Gun Bill

Cabinet will act quickly to introduce another gun bill following today’s resumption of Parliament, said Public Safety Minister Bill Blair. “There is no greater urgency than making sure our community is safe,” he told reporters.

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Sunday Poem: “Alienation”

 

Albertans believe
they are treated unfairly,
citing job losses,
taxation,
environmental regulations
and difficulty in getting
resources to markets.

A growing number
call for separation
from Canada.

But where would they go?

I turn the page
of my morning paper.

Two Albertans,
Jenni Sidey-Gibbons and Joshua Kutryk,
just graduated
NASA’s Artemis program.

They would be the pioneers
exploring opportunities
on the Moon,
preparing for Mars.

 

(Editor’s note: poet Shai Ben-Shalom, an Israeli-born biologist, examines current events in the Blacklock’s tradition each and every Sunday)

Review – Nazis In Northern Ontario

Hitler’s publicist once spent the winter in Red Rock, Ont., humming the Horst Wessel Song and cursing his fate. In the carnival of Canadian oddities, none is more curious than The Little Third Reich On Lake Superior. Historian Ernest Zimmerman of Lakehead University chronicles the strange events that saw 1,150 men and boys – Jews and Nazis alike – herded into bunkhouses northeast of Thunder Bay in the winter of 1940.

It was a “third-rate jungle prison”, one inmate recalled; another complained it was like being kidnapped and dragged into the wilderness. “They deeply resented the treatment,” Zimmerman writes; “They resented being in foreign surroundings, away from home, and being treated as prisoners of war rather than refugees.”

Professor Zimmerman died in 2008, still working on his manuscript. His drafts and notes were compiled into this lively chronice by two Lakehead historians, Michel Beaulieu and David Ratz.

On May 30, 1940 Britain’s wartime cabinet asked Canada to take 35,000 enemy aliens off its hands. Note the date: German U-boats were prowling the Atlantic; Norway, France and the Low Countries had fallen to the Nazis; and Britain feared imminent attack. “The rationale was that in the event of a German invasion, the threat of a ‘fifth column’ would be reduced,” Zimmerman writes.

Deportees were a mix of merchant sailors, Hitler youth, Jewish refugees and pretty much anyone with a German passport now branded a security risk. “Instead of using the deportation as an opportunity to distinguish real Nazis from actual non-Nazis, the selection process for deportation degenerated into a ‘mere juggling of numbers, as if a train timetable were being arranged, and not the disposition of human beings,’” notes Little Third Reich.

They were banished to Québec City aboard the Canadian Pacific liner Duchess Of York and put on a passenger train for the two-day journey to internment at an abandoned paper mill. Little Third Reich counts 26 such camps nationwide from Kananaskis Park in Alberta to Montréal’s St. Helen’s Island, future site of Expo 67. None were bigger than Camp R at Red Rock.

Refugees and Nazis “viewed each other with ‘horror and loathing’,” Zimmerman writes, yet camp life settled into a passable routine with few incidents save occasional fistfights and crude score-settling. When the camp commander ordered kitchen staff to prepare a kosher meal for Chanukah, Nazi cooks instead served bacon: “In general there is a fairly friendly atmosphere in the camp,” a visiting officer wrote. “However, there will always be tension while there are two intensely hostile groups.”

Inmates had radios and movie nights, swam in Lake Superior, and organized boxing tournaments and a brass band. Food was plentiful – “never the same soup two days in a row” – and prisoners whiled away the hours at a woodshop making handicrafts to sell in the drugstore at nearby Nipigon, Ont. Ships in a bottle sold for $1.75.  “There is just no variety at all,” lamented one inmate. “Every day, roll call, meals, another roll call, bed. You lose your sense of time.” There were worse ways to spend the war.

Camp R was home to minor celebrities. Inmates included a cousin of the Red Baron; a foreign correspondent for the liberal daily Vossische Zeitung, the first newspaper to serialize the anti-war novel All Quiet On The Western Front; and Ernst Hanfstaengl, a Bavarian bon vivant who’d served as publicity agent for Adolf Hitler in the early years and claimed to have invented the salute “Sieg Heil”.

The camp lasted sixteen months, a peculiar corner of the war in Northern Ontario. No plaque marks the site.

By Holly Doan

The Little Third Reich On Lake Superior by Ernest R. Zimmerman; University of Alberta Press; 384 pages; ISBN 9780-8886-46736; $29.95

Confirm Cronyism In Hiring

An internal report cites cronyism in the Department of Public Works. Unnamed employees privately complained to an ombudsman of preferential hiring by managers, including sweetheart appointments of family members: “Many employees are afraid to speak openly.”

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Can’t Rush U.S. Trade Pact

Cabinet yesterday said it’s resigned to parliamentary hearings on a continental free trade pact. Two opposition parties questioned the agreement, while the Senate trade committee has asked for greater scrutiny of claimed benefits of all trade deals: “This is way too important to stall.”

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Repair After ‘Abysmal’ Audit

Parks Canada yesterday said it’s restoring a decrepit 18th century landmark after auditors faulted the agency for letting the property fall into disrepair. The Auditor General rated Old Montréal’s Joseph-Louis Papineau House in poor condition though Parks Canada has owned it since 1982: “I mean, the government doesn’t look good.”

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Fed Challenge On Herbicide

The Federal Court yesterday opened hearings on a challenge of Health Canada’s continued licensing of a bestselling weed killer. Lawyers for Safe Food Matters Inc. sued to halt the sale of glyphosate marketed under the Roundup brand developed by Monsanto Co.: “We know it’s in lentils, chickpeas and baby food.”

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Major Flood At Nt’l Archives

The national archives suffered a “major flood” in 2018 that damaged books and records but withheld information from the public. The agency yesterday denied any parts of its collection were ruined, though an auditors’ report cited “damage” and photos obtained through Access To Information showed an inch of water pooled on the floor: “Water is pouring in.”

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Insurer Wins Marijuana Case

Insurers may reject claims by homeowners who fail to report marijuana on the property, the British Columbia Court of Appeal said yesterday. Judges upheld the refusal by Wawanesa Mutual Co. of Winnipeg to honour payouts under a $1.37 million policy to a cannabis grower: “Would it matter if I grew tomatoes or cucumbers?”

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Rate Cut Worth $25 A Month

A cabinet promise to cut cellphone bills by a quarter would save Canadians $11 to $25 a month, according to CRTC data. Legislators have grumbled over weak federal regulation of rates for mobile service plans: “It’s basically a cartel, let’s face it.”

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