Warn On Corruption In China

Canadians doing business in China should beware of Communist Party fronts, extortion, bid-rigging and other corrupt practices, says the Trade Commissioner Service. A federal guide for Canadian investors also warns of “bribery required to get things done.”

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Must Rescue French, Says Joly

First-ever legislation requiring federally-regulated private employers to promote French will be introduced, Languages Minister Mélanie Joly said yesterday. Joly blamed the internet for overwhelming French in an “ocean” of English: "We know there is a decline of French in Québec and in Canada."

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Air Canada Gets $5.9B Bailout

Cabinet last night put taxpayers back in the airline business for the first time since 1988. Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland approved the purchase of $500 million in Air Canada shares after Parliament privatized the carrier 33 years ago: "We wanted a good deal, not just any deal."

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Didn’t Know PLA Was Here

Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan last night said he was unaware the People’s Liberation Army attended winter training exercises in eastern Ontario three years ago. Sajjan said he personally put a stop to the practice following the detention of two Canadian businessmen in Beijing: "I wasn’t aware it was actually taking place."

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Execs Protest Plastic Blacklist

The plastics industry yesterday protested a cabinet proposal to list their product as toxic under federal law. Executives said the listing under the Canadian Environmental Protection Act unfairly stigmatizes household goods from food containers to intravenous tubes: "Industry has been lobbying hard against this approach."

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Arctic Sea Ice Up 27%: Report

Arctic sea ice grew 27 percent last year, the Department of Environment reported yesterday. The figures contradicted claims by then-Environment Minister Catherine McKenna that the Arctic “is literally melting": "Is that what we want?"

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Money Laundering At $113B

Criminal money laundering in Canada is worth up to $113 billion a year, says a federal report. The mafia is mainly active in three cities while motorcycle gangs operate nationwide: "The Covid-19 pandemic has created ripples throughout the criminal marketplace affecting the operations of different organized crime groups."

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Warns On Climate ‘Activism’

Superintendent of Financial Institutions Jeremy Rudin is warning of climate activism in the courts. “Governments in Canada have already seen the launch of some litigation related to climate change,” said Rudin: "We are seeing an increase in activism using the courts."

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Would Limit Criminal Checks

Public Safety Minister Bill Blair’s department is endorsing a legislated ban on universal criminal background checks as discriminatory to convicted felons. The proposal follows new research indicating the jobless rate for parolees is fifty percent: "Employer bias is a barrier that individuals with criminal records commonly encounter."

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Fed Court Repeals Christmas

The Federal Court is repealing “Christmas.” Amendments to 1998 Federal Court Rules propose to delete references to the Christmas recess as non-inclusive for lawyers, plaintiffs and defendants who practice other religions or none at all: "Not all litigants before the Courts celebrate Christmas."

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Can’t Explain Rejection Rates

Newly-released figures show suspiciously high rejection rates of Disability Tax Credit claims by the Canada Revenue Agency. Paperwork should be “a lot more user-friendly,” said the vice-chair of a federal advisory panel: "There are definitely more questions to be answered by looking through the data."

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Feds Strip Ex-Chief Of Medal

Rideau Hall has stripped a former police chief of his federal Order of Merit of the Police Forces. Officials did not explain if they'll attempt to retrieve the 2011 medal from Frank Elsner, ex-chief of police in Victoria: "He stood in a position of power and responsibility."

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Must Pay Tax, Court Rules

A First Nation tobacco wholesaler that ships millions of cigars a year must pay tax, Ontario Divisional Court has ruled. The judgment came in the case of a tobacconist who claimed tax exemption under the Indian Act: 'The purpose is not to give First Nation persons a general economic advantage.'

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“Work Force Adjustment”

Poet Shai Ben-Shalom, an Israeli-born biologist, writes for Blacklock’s each and every Sunday: “In the lobby of a federal building three faces were smiling from the wall: Her Majesty the Queen, The Right Honourable Prime Minister, and The Honourable Minister…”

Book Review: One Evening In Québec

In 1997, returning home one evening from a cruise on the St. Lawrence River, criminologist Patrice Corriveau witnessed an assault. Five men were tormenting a sixth.

“A gang of arrogant roughnecks, bursting with testosterone, decided to taunt him; they deem his attire too effeminate and conclude he must be a ‘faggot,’ a ‘queer,’” writes Corriveau. “With unbelievable violence, these brave souls shove the young man around as a crowd watches without reacting or intervening in any way.”

Upset by what he’d seen, Professor Corriveau of the University of Ottawa devoted his doctoral studies to the persecution of gays in French culture, typically men “used as scapegoats by a society disturbed by sexuality,” he writes. The result, La Répression des homosexuels au Québec et en France, is adapted to English by UBC Press.